Sawdust. Tons of sawdust.

The weather has been crappy this week. The next step is to put up sheathing, but I'm using OSB (oriented strand board), and OSB does not like water. It soaks it up and swells the panels in short time. The key is to get it covered with house wrap before it gets exposed to moisture. I need to hang it all, cover it, and get the roof up quickly to prevent it from getting wet on the inside. Speaking of the roof; I'm using OSB sheathing on it, as well. Plywood would probably hold up to a few days of rain better, but it is still prone to warp when wet. The big plus is that OSB is almost 2/3 cheaper than plywood.

So, I've spent several hours of the last couple days cutting the lumber I bought a couple weeks ago. I touched on it before, but I bought a bunch of Red Oak boards from a guy that cut them on his own sawmill, originally intending them to be fence rails. Red Oak has beautiful grain and some cool knots. I'm running the planks through my table saw and slicing them vertically. This means cutting them down to manageable four-foot sections, and running them twice through the saw; cutting halfway through on the first pass, then flipping the board and making a second pass. Cutting three inches each time it goes through is slow and creates a LOT of sawdust. I've already filled a 25-gallon trash bag, and I've only cut a little more than 125 boards. I've got another 200+ to do. While it is monotonous work, the results are pretty cool. 

The plan is to use all these boards to serve as the interior walls and ceiling. It's little hard to calculate with certainty, but I think I have enough. Cutting them down to four feet means I can use them on the walls and ceiling, as the wall studs are 16 inches apart (actually 14.5 inches apart/16 inches from center to center), and the roof rafters are 24 inches apart (on center). 48 inches is easy to handle and produces less scrap. 

Headed to the Habitat for Humanity Restore in Atlanta this afternoon to look for a vanity or sink, and possibly another door. I had originally planned to work out the detail below the stairs today, and write about that on this blog, but that will wait till later in the week. 

PS - I watched a couple of episodes of Tiny House Hunters on the FYI Network. We don't have cable or satellite out here, but I can stream some things on-line. They had an episode where a couple was looking at tiny homes in Jackson Hole, WY. Shannon and I were just there this past summer, but stayed on the other side of the Tetons, in Driggs, ID. The thing that shocked me most was the couple's budget....$300,000!!! They used almost all of it, and got a spacious (sarcasm) 250sq. ft. Location, Location, Location? I guess. :-)

One of my Red Oak boards before being run through the table saw.

One of my Red Oak boards before being run through the table saw.

A board after going through the saw. It was cloudy, so it's hard to see the nice grain.

A board after going through the saw. It was cloudy, so it's hard to see the nice grain.

Boards cut down to 1/2 inch, 4 foot sections. I later stacked them to air in the rafters of my shop.

Boards cut down to 1/2 inch, 4 foot sections. I later stacked them to air in the rafters of my shop.

This is a rough idea of what the walls and ceilings will look like. Rustic, but cool, I think.

This is a rough idea of what the walls and ceilings will look like. Rustic, but cool, I think.